April 23, 2014

Educate parents rather than banning homemade lunches

Yeah…you read that right.  How does that make you feel?  It would be a bad day any day somebody would tell me I can’t send my child’s lunch to school.

“Nutrition wise, it is better for the children to eat at the school,” principal Elsa Carmona told the paper of the years-old policy. “It’s about … the excellent quality food that they are able to serve (in the lunchroom). It’s milk versus a Coke.”   Principal Carmona needs some educating. She’s looking ignorant. I get their issue:  milk vs. Coke.  I respect their concerns but not how they go about resolving the issue.  Address the parents individually that pack unhealthy lunches for their children.  DUH.  Educate those ignorant to the labels on packaged foods and explain the affects of high salt and high sugar on their child’s behavior, you don’t decide for the entire school to ban lunches from home.  Banning parents from sending lunch promotes ignorance. It’s my prerogative as a parent to send my child’s lunch and if I send it they better eat it.  Better yet, as a stay at home mom – don’t make me come up there during lunch time to sit with my child and watch them eat MY lunch from home.

As a parent I have my concerns about school lunch.  Is it fresh? Is it delicious?  Will my child eat it?  Are the portions large enough?  If it’s a hot meal, is it served cold or warm enough? Was it prepared with clean hands? Did the staff wear hair nets? When was the last time the cafeteria was inspected?  What grade did it receive? Is the USDA doing their job? *side eye* Let’s address all of that.

The issue has now become telling me, as a parent, what I can/can’t send for my child’s lunch.  NOBODY can tell me that, I’m not having it and I am sure I am not alone on this issue. Educate the parents sending the unhealthy lunches and leave the rest of us who have common sense alone.

 

original article: http://yhoo.it/fKml73

 

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley is a wife, mom, contract paralegal and freelance editor. She writes The Posh Blog, www.theposhblog.com and is a Social Influencer for an online retail forum. She resides in Suwanee, GA with her family.

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Social Media’s Most Important Rule: think before you post.

With the rise of Social Media, users need to beware and behave. Whether you’re a public figure or an everyday Joe, what you put out for the cyber-world to see can and will come back to bite you in the derriere.  It’s important to remember no matter how “private” the settings are, once it’s put out there in cyber space, it’s there to stay.

Social Media new accounts are on the rise daily in staggering numbers; Twitter gets about 460,000 new accounts daily, there are currently 500,000,000 active Facebook users and approximately 1 in every 13 people log in actively and YouTube has 490 million unique users worldwide.  According to Mashable.com, “More video content is uploaded to YouTube in a 60 day period than the three major U.S. television networks created in 60 years.”  These are humongous numbers.  Social Media is being used by all; professionally and personally.

It is important to be mindful of what you are going to post/tweet before you send it into cyberspace.  We’ve all heard about the inappropriate teacher on FaceBook, the relationship that broke up due to FaceBook, the inappropriate Tweet by a celebrity…it goes on and on.  I am not one of those that blames FaceBook or whatever Social Media site; I blame the user.  FaceBook isn’t breaking up marriages – the cheating spouse using FaceBook to cheat is breaking up marriages.  Some of my friends argue that they want to be themselves and it’s their personal page…yada yada yada…I say that may be true, but others can and may see it and think of you differently–are you prepared for that?  Tip:  Before you hit send just ask yourself if you want your name and message on the front page of the newspaper.  Once it’s out there it, we can’t retrieve it.  Post smart and safe.

Stats Taken from:

stephenslighthouse.com
digitalbuzzblog.com
mashable.com

 

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley is a wife, mom, contract paralegal and freelance editor. She writes The Posh Blog, www.theposhblog.com and is a Social Influencer for an online retail forum. She resides in Suwanee, GA with her family.

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Do men really want an independent woman?

As a little girl I was raised to be strong, well educated and independent just like my strong, well educated and single mom.  While these are all traits we want to see in our daughters, I wasn’t taught or even told about how to be a wife.  One of my besties and I were having one of our heart to heart discussions which almost always leads to an “ah ha!” moment.

We were discussing her last few dates. She’s beautiful and doesn’t have a hard time finding men, but quality men who aren’t intimidated by her is scarce.  She is in management and has created a great living for herself, has her Master’s and owns property.  Like many young women she desires a man to share her life with.  Why then can’t she find him?  She doesn’t go clubbing and Lord knows I don’t want her to find him there…but what’s she to do and where is she to meet him.  She’s not my only beautiful on the inside and out, educated woman friend in this position.  I’m going to dissect her next dates in an attempt to determine why.  From her past ventures I’ve come up with a list of issues: he may think she’s unattainable (I’m assuming due to her confident air), he may want to control her (that won’t work with her independent trait), he may be too agreeable (responding with yes to everything with no mind of his own), he has no aspirations for more out of life, he may be a homebody or he may be insecure.

I asked her if he was a confident, good looking, kind hearted man who worked at a low paying job if she’d date him.  Her reply was yes, but has yet to experience that type of man “step to her.”  Right now I wish I lived in the same city as her…I’m sure I’d get into a lot of trouble but is it her or them?

I have to admit, I had to learn to tone myself down when I got married (my husband will chuckle).  I realized I didn’t have to be in charge of everything as I did when I was single.  It’s still hard sometimes for me and I wander if she’s being too tough due to past pains and being single so long. As a mom of daughters, I am raising them to be smart, strong, well educated, independent.  I know they see all those things in me…hopefully they see the compromise and sharing that comes with being married, too.

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley is a wife, mom, contract paralegal and freelance editor. She writes The Posh Blog, www.theposhblog.com and is a Social Influencer for an online retail forum. She resides in Suwanee, GA with her family.

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Don’t settle for the ADD/ADHD label

My oldest daughter gives me the most gray hairs.  At 17, I still have to manage her academically.

When she was in 8th grade her grades were horrible.  I was reteaching the material at home so she could do her homework.  She couldn’t remember things I had just taught her.  I emailed all her teachers to find out if she was paying attention in class; they all replied that she was!  They said she was a joy to have in class, organized and paid attention.  Why was she struggling for C’s and D’s then?  Why wasn’t she retaining what she was learning in a matter of an hour?

I started to probe school administration. I was concerned though about confidentiality, making sure she wasn’t just another brown girl to be quickly misdiagnosed with ADD/ADHD. And frankly, I wanted to be sure the latest testing/measurement techniques were utilized.  Sue me, but the overall school system is broken and many employees are overworked and underpaid so my husband and I opted for private testing.  After a consult with her Pediatrician, we were referred to a Clinical Psychologist for a Psycho-Educational Evaluation.  The cost?  A little shy of $1000.  The results? Priceless.  After weeks of behavioral observation, review of school records and various testing we were called in to meet with the psychologist and received a 6 page Summary and Recommendation.

To sum it all up, she didn’t fit in the ADD/ADHD box.  She had habits that ruled her out to be diagnosed with having ADD/ADHD, but did indeed struggle with focusing and forgetfulness.  The doctor’s recommendation? A low dosage of stimulant medicines to be taken on school days only (pretty much what ADD/ADHD patients get but a much lower dosage) and the following classroom modifications: front of the class seating, additional individualized prompting from the teacher and extended test times.

I was concerned about the school administration following the recommendations in the report but the doctor explained to me that her written report is a legal document and they are bound by law to follow her recommendations.  Hallelujah!!  I scheduled a meeting with all her teachers, her guidance counselor and the school system’s psychologist.  We discussed the findings and I privately provided a copy to the school psychologist.  I did not share with them that she’s be on meds as I only shared what I felt was important – additional prompting, preferred seating and extended test time.  The teacher’s were not allowed a copy and the report was noted not to be copied.  I used to teach and I didn’t want her put into a “box” so I am a donkey’s butt about confidentiality in the school system.

She is now in 11th grade and she is a straight B student (even in math).  We’ve had to adjust her meds due to headaches as a side effect and up her dosage a little but now she is preparing to take the SAT and ACT.  She doesn’t like that fact that she has to take a prescribed medicine but I just keep reiterating the reasoning and necessity behind it.  It’s helping and the bottom line is in the results.  I can always tell when a few days have been missed because the grades drop and assignments are late. At first, it was very scary and emotional for me to come to terms with the fact that she has to take a stimulant to help her neurologically, but part of being a good mom is staring the issues in the face and trying to fix them the best we can.

I urge all my friends to not be easily swayed with the ADD/ADHD label. Ask plenty of questions and do your own research.  While many people cannot afford private care, take your insurance to the best doctor in town (I believe in the value of that).

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley is a wife, mom, contract paralegal and freelance editor. She writes The Posh Blog, www.theposhblog.com and is a Social Influencer for an online retail forum. She resides in Suwanee, GA with her family.

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Make it Happen Monday: Uninvolved parents

Uninvolved parentsWhat happened to parenting our children?

I’ve been annoyed lately at the lack of parenting I have noticed. Parents don’t want to share commuting their kids around, they don’t send them out with money, they don’t support their activities, and they don’t talk to them about…LIFE. Our jobs aren’t over when they become teens. Selfish parents.

My daughter has a friend who has 2 parents in the home that don’t want to drive her anywhere to hang out with her friends. I was going out of my way to pick her up only to get there and see her parents in their jammies while I drive their child around to realize if I didn’t do it…she’d go nowhere. The worst part? She knows it, too. She’s always at home hoping to go somewhere.

Another instance? Another friend. When there is a football game at their school or any event they are both interested in , she needs a ride. The first thing I ask my daughter: if I drive you, will they bring you back? The answer is always “no.” WTH?! It’s common courtesy to share the responsibility of driving them. Typically, my husband or I will drop off/pick up and one of the other parents will do the other. Makes perfect sense. It’s different if it’s a single parent…I will do more because I am an at home mom and am able to, but with 2 parents in the home, there is no excuse, a door mat I am not. I do believe in the idealism of “It Takes a Village” but this is beyond those parameters.

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley is a wife, mom, contract paralegal and freelance editor. She writes The Posh Blog, www.theposhblog.com and is a Social Influencer for an online retail forum. She resides in Suwanee, GA with her family.

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Save money at the gas station.

While gas prices have come down, keeping any and every cost down is important in today’s tough economic times. My husband mentioned to me that when I make fast starts or sudden stops I’m using more gas. I wanted to learn more about this “notion” of his and found these great tips on saving money at the gas pump on bankrate.com:

Car maintenance
1. Keep the tires inflated properly. This one is simple and a potential lifesaver. Under-inflated tires waste fuel and wear out the tire tread. Also, check tires regularly for alignment and balance.

2. A well-tuned engine burns less gas. Get regular tune-ups and follow through with routine maintenance. The right parts and fresh oil keep your engine happy and less thirsty for gas.

3. Get the junk out of the trunk. A weighed-down car uses more fuel. For every extra 250 pounds your engine hauls, the car loses about one mile per gallon in fuel economy. Carry only the basic emergency equipment and items you really need.

Gas shopping
4. Buy the lowest grade (octane) of gasoline  for your car. Check your owner’s manual for this information. As long as your engine doesn’t knock or ping, the fuel you’re using is fine. You can save hundreds of dollars a year.

5. Pay cash at stations that charge extra for credit cards.

6. Don’t top off the gas tank. Too much gas will just slosh or seep out. Why waste those extra pennies?

Driving
7. Drive intelligently; don’t make fast starts or sudden stops. You’re just overexerting your engine and burning extra fuel. Gradual acceleration also helps automatic transmissions run better. Engine-revving wastes fuel, too.

8. Lighten up on the accelerator. The faster you drive, the more gas you use. Speed limits have gone up around most of the nation, but you don’t have to see your fuel consumption go up drastically as well. For example, driving at 55 mph rather than 65 mph can improve your fuel economy by two miles per gallon.

9. Avoid long warm-ups. Even on cold winter mornings, your car doesn’t need more than a minute to get ready to go. Anything more and you’re just burning up that expensive fuel.

10. Combine errands into one trip and plan your stops for the most efficient route. You’ll save yourself time and money.

11. Do not rest your left foot on the brake. The slightest pressure could cause a drag that will demand more gas use — and wear out the brakes sooner.

Other good habits
12. Tighten up that gas cap. Make sure it’s on securely. Buy a new one if your current cap doesn’t fit snugly. Gas easily evaporates from the tank if it has a way to escape.

13. Buy a fuel-efficient car. When pricing cars, factor in long-term fuel costs. Keep in mind that sunroofs add to wind resistance, lowering the mileage per gallon.

14. Be smart with the air conditioning. On the highway, closed windows decrease air resistance, so run the air conditioner. But in stop-and-go traffic, shutting off the air conditioning and opening the windows can lighten your fuel use. Air conditioning can lower your fuel economy by 10 percent to 20 percent.

15. Remove snow tires in good weather. Deep tread and big tires use more fuel.

Also, check your local news station online for local gas rates and locations!

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley

Pascha Dudley is a wife, mom, contract paralegal and freelance editor. She writes The Posh Blog, www.theposhblog.com and is a Social Influencer for an online retail forum. She resides in Suwanee, GA with her family.

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